Saturday, 5 June 2010

Pavlova with cream & macerated berries

Until very recently, I was adamant I would *hate* pavlova for the rest of my life. I resigned to the fact that I'd be ridiculed by my fellow Australians and would probably be told how
"unaustralian" I am :P  I just couldn't stand the excessive sweetness and the claggy insides of purchased pavlovas whether they be from supermarkets or restaurants.

But what was I thinking?! That was before I experienced homemade pavlova. I was inspired to try making my own after watching the Donnay Hay challenge early on in Masterchef this season.
The great ballerina - Anna Pavlova.
Beautiful and delicate, just like the dessert named after her.

150 ml eggwhite (approximately 4 eggs)
1 c caster sugar, plus extra for the berries
2 tbsp cornflour (sifted)
2 tsp white vinegar
1 cup pure cream
200- 250 g mixed frozen berries (I used Creative Gourmet)
1 tsp icing sugar

1. Preheat the oven to 150 degrees celcuis and prepare a baking tray lined with baking paper. Place an 18cm round baking tin on the dull side of the baking paper and draw a circle around it. Then flip it over with the shiny side up, and sprinkle a very fine amount of extra cornflour over the paper.
2. Place the eggwhites in a bowl and whisk to stiff peaks using an electric mixer.
3. Gradually add the sugar, whisking well, until the mixture is stiff and glossy.

4. Add the cornflour and vinegar and whisk until just combined.
5. Turn the mixture out onto the prepared tray and shape into a round using the marked circle as a guide.
6. Reduce the oven to 120 degree celcius and bake the pavlova for 1 hour 20 minutes.

7. Switch the oven off and allow the pavlova to cool completely.

8. Whisk the cream with a teaspoon of icing sugar until soft peaks form.
9. To prepare the berry mixture, combined the frozen berries and 2 teaspoons caster sugar in a small saucepan over very low heat and allow to soften slightly. This only takes a few minutes and ensures the sugar dissolves, and that the berries are not too tart on the palate. This process should not cook the berries, in fact, they should still be cold. Berries vary in tartness, so do taste and add a little more sugar if desired.
10. Sliding a large knife under the pavlova to ensure it is separated from the baking sheet, carefully transfer to your serving plate. Dress the cooled pavolva with cream and berries. Serve immediately and enjoy!

Messy goodness

- Make sure your eggs are at room temperature before you start.
- Add the sugar gradually by sprinkling teaspoonfuls of the sugar into the meringue. This should take about 10 minutes, so be patient...

The scene of the crime

The thing I enjoy about making pavlova is that it is a labour of love. You need to take care and patience to ensure you achieve the crisp shell and marshmallow-like interior, but it doesn't have to look perfect. As you can see, mine became rather messy... but I can guarantee you, there were no complaints! It was delicious :)

So tell me, readers, was there ever a dish that you disliked until you made it yourself?

Ladybird x


  1. That's a gorgeous pavlova. I alwyas find it a little tricky to make, will be sure to try out your method next time!

  2. Love the opening photo with the drips-yum! :D I've always loved it but I remember hating seafood when I was little and now I love it :)

  3. Oh, delicious. I love how a good pavlova gets that beautiful pearly shimmer to the crispy exterior.

    Glad you've come around, Anna :)

  4. You've managed to perfect this iconic Aussie dessert! It looks beautiful with the berries on top. As for a dish I thought I would hate until I made it myself, banana bread!

  5. nice pavlova =)
    makes me wanna make one now =)

  6. This looks so delicious, I adore berries!


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